THEDIGITALEDITION

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TAR BOOK

BY MARGUERITE HUMEAU

THE THINGS

TAR

presents

TAR

 

'"TAR is a tremendous flight of fantasy for those who need to plan a way to escape from this planet or to save it."

@TarMagTwits

Week 2014, Mar 10- Mar 14

STORY

The struggle is over.

Gender bender

is the new Sex.

Act 1.

Genderbending

Gender bender is an informal term used to refer to a person who actively rebels against, or "bends," expected gender roles. Gender bending is sometimes a form of social activism undertaken in response to assumptions or over-generalisations about genders. Some gender benders identify with the gender assigned them at birth, but "challenge" the norms of that gender through androgynous behavior and atypical gender roles. Gender benders may also self-identify as transgender or genderqueer, feeling that the gender assigned to them at their birth is an inaccurate or incomplete description of themselves; some are transsexual and desire to change their physical sex through hormone therapy or sex reassignment surgery.

 

 

Collier Schorr.

"Forest Bed Blanket (Black Velvet)," 2001

C-print, 35 x 44 inches Edition of 5

Courtesy 303 Gallery, New York

Wetzer & Baauw.

MEN TO BE (ode to Bart Hess)

All rights reserved © Wetzer & Baauw.

“I’m awfully sorry. I didn’t mean to frighten you. But you don’t know what I’ve been through. And all because I was afraid. I’m so ashamed of the fuss I made.”

 

Snow White

from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs feature film, premiered at the Carthay Circle Theatre on December 21, 1937

 

 

 

 

"The way to a man’s heart is through his stomach."

 

Girls want to be boys. Boys that they love. In the triptych ‘MEN TO BE’ Wetzer & Baauw use masculine metaphors of consumption to give an ode to the artists they admire.

Lynn Hershman.

Roberta's Construction Chart #2. 1976

Chromogenic color print, printed 2003, 22 15/16 x 29 5/8" (58.3 x 75.3 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. The Modern Women’s Fund. © 2013 Lynn Hershman Leeson

Act 2.

Gendershift

Sexologist John Money introduced the terminological distinction between biological sex and gender as a role in 1955. Before his work, it was uncommon to use the word gender to refer to anything but grammatical categories. However, Money's meaning of the word did not become widespread until the 1970s, when feminist theory embraced the concept of a distinction between biological sex and the social construct of gender.

 

 

Between 1974 and 1978, Lynn Leeson assumed the fictional alter ego Roberta Breitmore, a single woman in the San Francisco Bay area during years of tumultuous social upheaval. Breitmore’s background, education, and childhood memories are a composite of accumulated psychological data. Leeson, as Breitmore, wore makeup, a blond wig, and a certain style of clothing; she maintained a small apartment, had a checking account, credit cards, and a driver’s license, saw a psychiatrist, participated in the Weight Watchers diet program, and placed personal ads looking for dates—men who became unwitting participants in her performance. In the third year of the project, Leeson engaged three other people to perform as Breitmore. The performance concluded in November 1978, commemorated by an exorcism of Breitmore in the Gallerie d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, in Ferrara, Italy. All that remains is a cache of documentation, including photographs, drawings, surveillance reports, films, letters, and legal and medical papers.

Act 3.

Gendermorphing

Thai artist Hom Phanphiroj started Identity Crisis in 2007 as a documentary survey of transsexuals and transvestites, presented in a triptych format. The first of the three mug shots shows the subject without make-up, eyes closed, a hint of embarrassment rising from his/her features. The second shot of the subject is taken with the eyes closed, waiting for the transformation, and the last shot shows the subject with eyes opened and full make-up, wearing a smile of fulfillment.

Ohm Phanphiroj,

IDENTITY CRISIS: TRANSEXUAL SERIES #3

courtesy of Sony World Photography Awards 2009

Bettina Rheims

Gender Studies - Portrait  of Andrej Pejić, 2011

© Bettina Rheims

“If we talk about sexual orientation, i’ll say that love has no boundaries. Actually I’m single: I think I’m not particularly attracted by sex, even if i believe in feelings. Instead, if we talk about gender, i’m very comfortable with the ambiguity that i’m representing. I realize that I’m really feminine, not only in my aspect, but in my way of being too.”

 

Andrej Pejić

Fashion model

from 2012 interview

Vanity Fair Italy

 

 

Bettina Rheims' body of work Gender Studies, depicts transsexuals, women that have become men, men that have become women and a third gender; those that preferred not to choose a sex and exist as both, adopting a dual identity.

TAR is the sticky stuff we pave our roads and build our roofs with.

It affords us travel and shelters us from the storm. It is also an anagram of the word art.

The editorial staff have taken every care to obtain from copyright holders the authorization to publish the pictures in this issue. In any cases where this has not been possible, the editorial staff would like to make it known that they are available to eligible parties to settle any amounts that are owed.

Tar Editori S.r.l / Corso Verceli 23, 20144 MILANO - ITALY -

C.F.P.IVA: 05488720961

TAR magazine digital edition  wishes to thanks

 

effimera F O N D A Z I O N E maison d'art numérique